Stories from the field

thumbnail
© IFAD
Bringing land plots together to increase agricultural productivity

Intensifiying agricultural production is one of the key objectives of the Rwandan government to reduce poverty and guarantee food security. The Crop Intensification Programme (CIP) was introduced in 2007 at the national level to increase agricultural productivity and reduce import of staple agricultural products such as rice.

Source: IFAD

thumbnail
© IFAD
Supporting Natural Resources Management through Community Innovation Centres

The Centre Communautaire d'Innovation (CCI) or Community Innovation Centres were first introduced in Rwanda to provide technical and organisational support to small farmers as part of a pilot project supported by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the Support Project for the Strategic Plan for the Transformation of Agriculture (PAPSTA). The initiative became so successful that it was replicated and extended in 2010 under a new project, the Kirehe Community-based Watershed Management Project (KWAMP).

Source: IFAD

thumbnail
© IFAD
A new biogas system for Africa

Biogas is becoming increasingly more popular as a form of energy to power rural communities in Africa who live far away from the electricity grid. As a low-cost integrated system providing alternative energy as well as organic manure, it also provides an answer to reducing gas emissions and improving soil fertility.

Source: IFAD

thumbnail
© IFAD
Sacred cows of Rwanda

For small farmers in Rwanda, livestock and cows in particular, are an important element of a household, considered as an economic asset as well as a symbol of wealth and social status. "The best wedding gift someone can give in Rwanda is a cow," explained Seraphine Umurerwa, Team Leader at Heifer Project International (HPI), the Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) specialized in livestock.

Source: IFAD

thumbnail
© IFAD
Coffee from Rwanda: savouring a dream

Coffee production is a traditional source of income for many Rwandans. But in the aftermath of civil war and the 1944 genocide, most coffee growers had to start again from scratch. An IFAD-financed project gave them a hand, helping them organize into cooperatives and gain access to Europe's lucrative fair trade markets. The project not only led to a substantial increase in their income, but it also contributed to the national reconciliation process.

Source: IFAD