Stories from the field

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© IFAD
Drip irrigation technology in Madagascar: a successful example of scaling up

What started as a pilot innovation in a limited area in Madagascar not only became a showcase of successful scaling up to other regions, but enabled a local industry to develop. "The drip irrigation technology is a good example of geographical and economical scaling up," said Caroline Bidault, Country Programme Manager at the International Fund for Agricultural Development in Madagascar. "Not only was it replicated in other areas, but local manufacturers started to produce the technology, adapting it to the local environment."

Source: IFAD

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© IFAD
IFAD-WFP scheme offers boost to Malagasy farmers

For years, the "Hery Mitambatra" farmers association in southern Madagascar has struggled to sell its surplus maize harvest. But in 2012, thanks to a partnership between the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP), the 150 members sold their grain to WFP at a fair price.

Source: IFAD/WFP

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© IFAD
IFAD's rice irrigation programme brings back hope

Madagascar -- The southern region is one of the driest in the otherwise relatively fertile island of Madagascar. Until very recently it was one of the country's poorest regions, and people there suffered from recurring famine. Rice cultivation was practiced there in the past but farmers could no longer ensure an adequate supply for food, and the economy of the entire region was in disarray.

Source: IFAD

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© Deutsche Welle TV
Deutsche Welle reports on IFAD project

A report on Deutsche Welle TV broadcast Christmas day featured IFAD’s Programme for the Promotion of Rural Revenue (PPRR).
Every November the East Coast of Madagascar sees the harvest of lychees, most of which are bound for export to Europe and America for the Festive Season. As stated in the DW-TV report, the programme has helped poor rural farmers to double their incomes by building a commodity chain based around the fruit. Other developed commodity chains include capiscum, honey, rice, maize, fish and rice. After a 2008 evaluation the programme is due to expand to neighbouring regions.
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© IFAD
IFAD's projects in Madagascar give women more opportunities, but the struggle continues

Women in Madagascar, as in other parts of the developing world, are slowly gaining more economic power through step-by-step involvement in new projects. They have proved to be highly responsible managers, sometimes more so than their male counterparts. Yet despite apparent progress they are still under-represented in the local economy and more often than not they are unaware of their possibilities.

Source: IFAD

Financial services and training allow vanilla-growers in Madagascar to invest in the future

North-east Madagascar is known for its production of vanilla and spices, a specialization that eventually led farmers to abandon food crops. From 1997 to 2006, an IFAD-supported project fostered a global approach linking production and marketing. It included activities to develop commercial vanilla production while promoting traditional rice farming. It also implemented a network of credit unions to provide access to financial services for poor farmers who were excluded from the banking system and relied on high-interest loans from other sources.

Source: IFAD

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© IFAD
Video: Strengthening land tenure security in Madagascar

Watch a video about an IFAD-funded project to support development in the Malagasy regions of Menabe and Melaky. Since 2006, the project has worked with the Madagascar’s National Land Tenure Programme to help secure land rights – especially for productive smallholder farmers benefiting from improved irrigation systems and rice cultivation.

IFAD